Curve is Crowdfunding

Curve is Crowdfunding: www.crowdcube.com/curve

As you may have seen, there’s exciting news here at Team Curve. We’ve just secured our Series B funding, taking total investment in Curve to over $70m and valuing the company at a quarter of a billion dollars. This investment marks the beginning of a new era in banking and places us in the top five UK Consumer Fintechs by valuation alongside Transferwise, Monzo, Revolut and Starling.


For the first time ever, we are offering eligible customers a chance to own a part of Curve by investing as little as £10.

Click here to read more and register your interest.

Investments of this nature carry risks to your capital, including illiquidity, lack of dividends and dilution. Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future results. Balance risk with a diversified portfolio. Approved as a financial promotion by Crowdcube Capital Limited, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (No 650205).

2019-09-02T17:30:00Z
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/curve-crowdfunding-tickets-70252648563?aff=Community


FAQs

Who can invest?

Any eligible customer over the age of 18 from anywhere in the world (Except for residents of the USA, Canada or Japan).

When will the campaign go live?

September, exact date TBA.

Will Curve customers have exclusive access to the investment?

Yes, we will provide a 48-hour window to eligible Curve customers who have registered interest to ensure you don’t miss out!

What will the valuation be?

We are raising funds at the same price as our Series B valuation.

What is the raise target?

TBA.

Who is an "eligible customer"?

Curve customers who would like to participate in the crowdfunding will need to signup on the Crowdcube website and meet the eligibility criteria to become a Crowdcube user before being eligible to participate in the crowdfund.

How much can I invest?

You can invest from as little as £10.

Who else has invested in Curve?

Gauss Ventures, Oxford Capital, Connect Ventures, IDC Ventures, Santander InnoVentures, Speedinvest, Seedcamp, Breega Capital, Sabadell, Invsestec, Outward VC (previously Investec’s INVC fund), Samos Investments, London Co-Investment Fund, Taavet Hinrinkus from Transferwise, Ricky Knox from Tandem amongst others.

What happens after I invest?

ou can find more details here

What is crowdfunding?

Crowdfunding is where a large number of people pool their money together to back a business they believe in, via an online platform. More information on crowdfunding can be found here.

Why is Curve crowdfunding?

We’ve witnessed an incredible period of growth both in customer base and team size here at Curve. Our team has grown to over 150 people, with offices in London and Bristol and we are on track to welcome our millionth customer by the end of the year. You, our community, have been the beating heart and existence of Curve and for that, we are eternally grateful. We felt adamant in saving a small allocation of our funding round to give you the chance to come onboard with us and share in our success.

How do I make a return on my investment?

Return may come via a liquidity event such as a trade sale, secondary market transaction or an IPO. However, as with all investments, there is a risk that you may lose all your investment. Please read all the risk warnings and documentation before making an investment

What are these exclusive investor rewards you speak of?

We will be offering investors a range of exclusive rewards alongside the equity they receive for their investment. Further details of these TBA soon.

What to do now?

If you have already registered interest above, make sure you’re signed up to Crowdcube early - seriously, don’t wait till the day. Tell all your friends to do the same!

9 Likes

Will Curve be providing any more details on business plans to prospective investors? Curve’s product growth is impressive, and I can see that there’s a vision behind it, but as far as I can tell it’s still massively loss-making, and unlike the other fintechs mentioned in the blog post, the major costs don’t reduce proportionally as the customer base grows. The rollout of the subscription products so far doesn’t exactly fill me with confidence either, as the rollout was poorly handled and I don’t see how Curve can compete with packaged account/rewards providers that have much larger scale.

I’m genuinely interested in the crowdfunding round, but I’d need to see a proper investment prospectus and evidence of some serious changes in the pipeline, rather than just the marketing content that’s on the crowdfunding site so far.

10 Likes

I’m very interested - look forward to seeing your detailed propositions. Will there be a potential investor event for Q&As and the like?

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Yes, there will be an event with presentation and Q&A :smiley:

4 Likes

You know what else has events with presentation and Q&A? Shady timeshares and ponzi schemes.
If you want to be reputable financial player and an investment opportunity to be taken seriously, there must be easily available access to some key financial figures and future plans.

4 Likes

I’m sad that you’ve chosen Crowdcube vs others.
But, I am thankful that you opened this opportunity! :pray:
Cant wait to see the details!

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Funny thing is, I was thinking few days ago about creating a thread to ask about opportunity to buy Your stock shares ect. and here we are :slight_smile:
Can’t wait to see more details.

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Thats exactly what I’m thinking.
The cost for Curve to charge the underlying card via GPS must be higher than the interchange fee (+commercial card bonus for some Curve users) so with every additional user + additional transaction Curve makes a bigger lose.
If curve could share some numbers that can ilustrate, that they actually make more % with every additional transaction I’d be more than happy to invest.

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But don’t forget that quite often they already have the money from the underlying card before the merchant has claimed the pending payment from Curve. So I guess they make some money sat on the money for a day or two in some cases.
Which is fair enough, they’ve got to make some money from somewhere.

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Not all bids are going to be successful. I think everyone has been given the opportunity to register an interest - I did and I’ve only been a member for less than a fortnight.

I wonder how they will decide who gets what. I think long standing members should have some sort of priority over those of us that have just jumped on board.

I don’t think you’ll get those numbers because I don’t believe they exist. There is simply no way they are profiting off interchange fees from personal cards.

Their strategy seems to be a freemium one - keep the free product as a loss-leader, and upsell people to profitable premium plans. That’s not necessarily a bad strategy, but to me the specifics of their plans seem flawed. They claim that because of their scale, they’re going to offer better value than consumers can find elsewhere. But they’re competing against companies (eg. American Express, HSBC) for whom curves customer numbers are a drop in the ocean. Curve’s free product is in a sense too good, offering everything that is unique to Curve, and the only incentive to upgrade is a poor value clone of products available elsewhere.

If you’re a VC investing in many long shots, then maybe Curve could be a good bet, but for regular people, I’m struggling to see the upside.

Of course, Curve employees have said many times that there’s big changes in the pipeline. I’ll wait and see what they come up with, and what they disclose to potential investors before deciding. Hopefully they can turn it around and build a sustainable business out of what is a great product.

4 Likes

Its hard to believe that company can attract $70m funding if their idea/plan is not backed up with something they can show to investors. I think Curve is doing fine.

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Yeah, they’re doing better than fine. Their customer numbers and average spend are impressive. For a VC, who wants to invest in lots of companies, each of which has a small probability of doing extremely well in the long term, it’s not a bad bet. Hence being able to raise £55m. For most people, who have much lower risk tolerance and shorter investment horizons than a VC, from what I’ve seen it looks like a poor investment.

Everyday investors should have different priorities and ask different questions than a VC. Just because some investment fund makes a strategic bet on a company does not mean that it’s a good investment for you and me.

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£1459
Monthly Average User Spend. Over lifetime.

Surely that isn’t just on Curve? I spend more than that a month, but a large amount is direct debits which go straight from my bank.

I can’t imagine the average customer spends that a month on Curve spending alone.

When will we find out how much you are raising, see a pitch deck etc.?

As you mentioned your Series B was oversubscribed, I can’t imagine there was much room for crowdfunding.

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What are the top 10 merchants used by Curve users?

I would bet they are financial services like account topups, as well as tax payments etc…

Then that figure starts to make sense.

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Mine would be paypal

Do you mean using Paypal to buy goods and services?

Buying games online
For ebay
Buying airline ticket, hotels
getyourguide
Shopping online